To help lessen the impact of COVID-19, we have temporarily closed our office to in-person services until further notice. Going forward, classes and events will be presented in ONLINE-ONLY format.

COVID-19

Resources and Information for Housing Providers and Renters

Click here for information about current COVID rules for operating rental housing.
This page includes dedicated information about:
To help lessen the impact of COVID-19, we have temporarily closed our office to in-person services until further notice. Going forward, our classes and events will be presented in ONLINE-ONLY format until concerns subside.

COVID Q&A

Refer to RHAWA's COVID-19 Q&A for Housing Providers for best practice information.

READ NOW >


Government Updates

RHAWA is actively working with cities, counties, and the Governor and Legislature to implement and understand emergency rental housing measures being put in to place for the rental housing industry, including pushing for direct financial support for renters and housing providers to ensure that homes remain open.
Click here for more information about the current COVID rules in place for operating rental housing. We will continue to update these details as they become available. 

Federal Housing Administration's Foreclosure and Eviction Moratorium

  • Effective March 18, 2020
  • Evictions of persons from properties secured by FHA-insured Single Family mortgages are suspended for 60 days.
  • Deadlines of first legal action and reasonable diligence timelines are extended by 60 days.

Governor Inslee announced on 6/2/2020 an extension of the evictions ban in place across the state through August 1, 2020.

The order extends prior rules put in place April 16 which were set to expire June 4. Also included in the extension is a continuation of the ban on rent increases, effective retroactively to February 29, 2020, thru 11:59pm on August 1, and no evictions or terminations of tenancy may be issued thru 11:59pm on August 1, with narrow exceptions granted regarding termination of tenancy under two circumstances.

Terminations are allowed when the direct owner intends to occupy the unit as their primary residence, requiring at least 60 days' notice of termination of tenancy, or the owner is selling the unit, requiring at least 60 days' notice. Neither of these scenarios address what occurs if a jurisdiction's local laws require longer periods of notice and it is recommended that owners contact an attorney in such situations prior to issuing the notice of termination of tenancy.

Under the updated order, rental housing owners may not:

    • Increase, or threaten to increase, rent or the amount of any deposit. This includes any increases sent prior to the order which have yet to take effect.

    • Assess late fees for non-payment of rent, effective retroactively to February 29, 2020, for rent not paid during the ban.

    • Evict residents, which includes:

      • A ban on service of 14 day pay or vacate notices, and;

      • A ban on service of 10 day notices for rules violations, unless the landlord, property owner, or property manager attaches an affidavit attesting that the action is necessary to respond to a significant and immediate risk to the health, safety, or property of others created by the resident (RHAWA recommends consulting an attorney prior to doing so).

    • Issue any notice of termination of tenancy. This ban also applies to tenancies or other housing arrangements that have expired or will expire during this period.

    Other details of the policy include:

    • Housing providers are prohibited from seeking or enforcing, or threatening to seek or enforce any eviction orders.

    • Law enforcement is prohibited from serving or threatening to serve physical eviction orders.

    • Housing providers may not charge rent to property where the tenant may not access the property due to the COVID-19 outbreak.

    • Housing providers may not collect any debt created by the nonpayment of rent or other charges on or after February 29, 2020 during the ban, unless they have offered the tenant a reasonable re-payment plan.

    • The ban on rent increases also includes commercial tenants who were impacted by the COVID-19 outbreak.

    • Housing Providers are prohibited from retaliating against individuals for invoking their rights or protections under these moratoriums.

Previous orders: Governor's Moratorium on Evictions | Modified Order

Governor Shelter in Place Order

  • Workers such as plumbers, electricians, exterminators, and other service providers who provide services that are necessary to maintaining the safety, sanitation, and essential operation of residences.
  • List of Essential Industries
  • Ordinance 2020-0191AN ORDINANCE relating to residential and commercial tenant protections during the COVID-19 pandemic; and declaring an emergency. - PASSED 6/23/2020
    • The legislation creates affirmative defense to an eviction proceeding if the tenant would be required to leave the unit between March 1, 2020 and March 1, 2021, for either nonpayment of rent or for a violation of rules in the rental agreement.

      • The defense is available when the reason for termination of tenancy is based on:
        • The tenant's failure to comply with a fourteen-day notice to pay rent or vacate
        • The tenant's habitual failure to comply with terms of the rental agreement resulting in the Housing Provider serving a notice to comply or vacate or a notice to pay rent or vacate three or more times within a twelve-month period.
      • To assert the defense the tenant must prove that the failure to pay or comply with the rules was due to the following reasons:
        • Illness
        • Loss or reduction of income
        • Loss of employment
        • Reduction of compensate hours of work
        • Business or office closure
        • A need to miss work to care for a family member or child, where that care is uncompensated
        • Other similar loss of income due to the COVID-19 pandemic
      • When considering whether to apply the defense afforded to tenants, the Court should balance the equities of the parties and consider material impacts to the owner as well as to the tenant.
      • The legislation also creates an affirmative defense to an eviction proceeding if the housing provider fails to offer a payment plan to residential and small commercial tenants experiencing a COVID-19 pandemic related hardship, as defined above, between March 1, 2020, and March 1, 2021.
        • Late fees, interest or other charges due to late payment of rent shall not accrue by March 1, 2021.
      • Housing Providers may not take any reprisal or retaliatory action against a tenant who exercises their rights under this ordinance.
  • King County Superior Court Emergency Order #15
  • All hearings, motions, and trials on residential evictions are stayed until April 17, 2020.
  • Sheriff Statement stopping the issuance of writs of restitution.
  • Suspending service or enforcement of evictions from March 17, 2020 until further notice.
  • Will still accept and keep court evictions sent to the Sheriff’s office but will not act upon them until they can do so later.
  • Mayor’s Original Executive Order 
  • Moratorium on residential evictions for non-payment ordered March 14, 2020 until the Proclamation of Civil Emergency ends, or 30 days after this Emergency Order. Will be evaluated for possible extension later.
  • Owner of a housing unit cannot issue or act upon an eviction notice for non-payment of rent, and no late fees or other charges from late payment shall accrue.
  • Housing providers are prevented from bringing forward civil eviction proceedings. The court can grant a future hearing for an eviction to be heard after the moratorium.
  • Modified Order 
    • Added Commercial Evictions

    • Increased the ban from 30 to 60 days

    • Included Commercial eviction in the ban

    • Prevented law enforcement from executing physical evictions

  • June 18, 2020 Modified Order
  • CB 119784 - AN ORDINANCE relating to termination of residential rental tenancies; providing a defense to evictions occurring within six months after the termination of the Mayor's residential eviction moratorium as amended by Resolution 31938; amending Section 22.206.160 of the Seattle Municipal Code; declaring an emergency; and establishing an immediate effective date; all by a 3/4 vote of the City Council. - PASSED MAY 6, 2020 
    • Housing Providers are preventing from bringing forward civil eviction proceedings within six months after the termination of the Mayor’s Eviction Moratorium if the reason for eviction is: 

      • The tenant fails to comply with a 14-day notice to pay-or-vacate during or six months after the Mayor’s Eviction Moratorium.

      • The tenant habitually fails to pay rent resulting in four or more pay-or-vacate notices within a 12 month period.

    • If a Housing Provider issues an eviction notice for the above reasons within the six month eviction ban then the notice must include this statement or it will be used as a defense to eviction: 

      • “If you cannot pay rent, during or within 6 months after the end of the Mayor’s moratorium on evictions, your inability to pay is a defense to eviction that you may raise in court.”
    • A court may require a tenant who successfully asserts a defense in a 14-day pay-or-vacate during or six months after the Mayor’s Moratorium Eviction to pay any owed rent in installments.

    • A court may require a tenant who successfully asserts a defense in a 14-day pay-or-vacate during or six months after the Mayor’s Moratorium Eviction to pay any owed rent in installments.

    • Attorney fees and court costs to a Housing Provider from an eviction proceeding regarding the listed reasons above are prohibited.

    • This bill would take effect immediately due to emergency

  • CB 119787 - AN ORDINANCE relating to the use of eviction records; regulating the use of eviction history in residential housing; prohibiting landlords from considering evictions related to COVID-19 during and after the civil emergency; amending the title of Chapter 14.09 and Sections 14.09.005, 14.09.010, 14.09.020, and 14.09.030 of, and adding a new Section 14.09.026 to, the Seattle Municipal Code; declaring an emergency; and establishing an immediate effective date; all by a 3/4 vote of the City Council. - PASSED MAY 15, 2020 
    • If a landlord screens potential tenants, the notice must now include: 
      • “The landlord is prohibited from taking an adverse action against a tenant based on eviction history occurring during or within six months after the end of the civil emergency proclaimed by Mayor Durkan on March 3, 2020, and that the Seattle Office for Civil Rights is the department that will enforce any violations of this ordinance.
    • Housing Providers cannot take adverse action against a prospective or existing tenant or occupant or a member of the tenant or occupant’s household based on any eviction history for six (6) months after the end of the Mayor’s Emergency Order unless its regarding action being taken by a tenant who was a threat to the health and safety of others.
    • The City "intends" that any eviction history during this six (6) month period after the end of the Mayor’s Emergency Order should be considered good cause for an order of limited dissemination unless eviction proceedings on the tenant were due to the tenant being a threat to the health and safety of others.
    • This bill would take effect immediately due to emergency.
  • CB 119788 - AN ORDINANCE relating to residential rental agreements; allowing residential tenants to pay rent in installments when the tenant is unable to timely pay rent; declaring an emergency; and establishing an immediate effective date; all by a 3/4 vote of the City Council. - PASSED MAY 15, 2020
    • The bill would require housing provider to allow tenants to pay rent owed in during, or within six months after, the Mayor's emergency proclamation on March 3, 2020, in installments as follows: 
      • The tenant will be allowed to pay one month or less of overdue rent in three consecutive equal, monthly installments.

      • The tenant will be allowed to pay over one month and up to two months of overdue rent in five consecutive, equal monthly installments.

      • The tenant will be allowed to pay over two months of overdue rent in six consecutive, equal monthly payments.

      • Any remainder will be due at the end of the payment period.

      • The tenant may propose an alternative payment schedule, which, if agreed to by the housing provider, shall be described in writing and signed by the tenant and housing and deemed an amendment to any existing rental agreement.

    • It can be a defense to an eviction if the notice does not contain the required information stating that the housing provider must provide the tenant a reasonable payment plan
    • Housing providers are prohibited from accruing late fees, interests, or "other charges", due to late payment of rent during, or within one year after the termination of, Mayor's emergency proclamation on March 3, 2020.
    • Attorney fees and court costs incurred by a housing provider from an eviction proceeding arising from this policy may not be awarded.  
    • This bill would take effect immediately due to emergency.

Operational Resources

  • Consider alternative agreements for rent payments, or granting payment plans, should your renter be impacted by COVID-19 and need assistance with their housing costs. Be sure to put these arrangements in writing as renters are only responsible to pay unpaid rent if the landlord, property owner, or property manager can demonstrate by a preponderance of evidence to a court that the resident was offered, and refused or failed to comply with, a re-payment plan that was reasonable based on the individual financial, health, and other circumstances of that resident.

    EXAMPLE: Ask tenants who will not be able to pay their April or May of 2020 rent on time to submit a written request for relief which includes a general description of their hardship or household situation.

    EXAMPLE: Allow tenants who cannot pay their full rent the opportunity to work on the property in exchange for partial rent credit.
  • The Governor’s emergency order in place, through 11:59pm on August 1, 2020, places a prohibition against assessing, or threatening to assess, late fees for the non-payment or late payment of rent or other charges where such non-payment or late payment occurred on or after February 29, 2020.

    EXAMPLE: Offer an installment payment plan to those who seek relief that allows tenants who will miss rent an opportunity to make up the amount over the next twelve months, with no fees or penalties.
  • Share the latest COVID-19 recommendations and updates provided by King County Public Health.
  • Remind your renters who are sick with cold or flu like symptoms to stay at home and
    consult their physician.
  • If your renter is sick, ask them to defer non-emergency work orders until they have
    recovered to ensure the health and safety of others, including maintenance staff and
    other renters, and to help limit the possible spread of sickness.
  • Maintenance requests involving conditions which threaten the health, safety, or welfare
    of the tenant and or unit should be handled carefully, with responding workers adhering to strict procedure to minimize exposure risks, including wearing gloves and masks.
  • When responding to a maintenance request at a unit where the tenant is sick or under quarantine, it is recommended that the tenant be asked to remain in an isolated part of the unit such as a bedroom or outdoor balcony to minimize the health risk posed to staff.
  • Seattle Housing Authority (SHA) has suspended HQS Annual Inspections effective Friday, March 13, 2020 thru at least through Wednesday, April 30, 2020. SHA is reaching out directly to those who would have been scheduled for an inspection during this time to provide more information. If you have concerns that you feel need to be immediately addressed by an HQS Inspection, or if you have other concerns or questions, please contact HCVInspectionsdesk@seattlehousing.org.
Showings
  • In-person showings of rental units, as well as signing of documents is permitted.
  • In-person meetings with customers are prohibited except when necessary for a customer to view a property or sign necessary documents. No real estate open houses are permitted.
  • Property viewings, inspections, appraisals, and final walk-throughs must be arranged by appointment and limited to no more than two people on site at any one time, exercising social distancing at all times. Perform electronic showings and virtual tours using technology that can assist you during this time, along with follow-up phone calls to limit public contact and to keep filling vacancies. 
  • Assess risk based on your specific location for in-person showings and institute cleaning and disinfecting protocols in accordance with the CDC recommendations before, during and after an in-person showing.
  • Limit your contact with others and requiring documentation regarding COVID-19 before sending any staff for maintenance issues, etc.

Rent Payment / Deposits
  • Do not accept in-person payments, if at all possible; accept online rent payments.
  • Create payment plans and get any and all arrangements in writing.
  • Use technology to accept security deposits or have funds wired into a special account.
  • Keep with the enforcement of contracts as law allows.
  • Stay knowledgeable on updated eviction laws regarding COVID-19 (laws vary – consult your legal professional). 
  • If you have tenants who are voucher holders, please consult the HUD page for information about how COVID-19 is affecting HUD’s Housing Choice Voucher Program.
  • Get informed about resources for rental owners who are affected by financial hardship due to COVID-19 as they become available.

During Lease Period / Maintenance
  • Request (but DON’T require) that tenants let you know if anyone in their household has contracted the virus so that outside vendors or staff don’t enter the property to perform maintenance work or mid-lease and annual inspections. Note: remember privacy,
    respecting privacy and only sharing general information, not specifics.
  • Institute strict protective procedures for maintenance workers with requests involving
    threatening health and safety conditions and welfare of the tenant/home conditions.
  • Put off routine maintenance projects for future dates in single family homes if at all
    possible.
  • Increase maintenance and cleaning of common areas in buildings.

Move-Out
  • Mandate cleaning procedures; at a minimum, be sure to follow CDC recommendations.
  • Mandate a “vacancy period” before anyone enters a unit/home.
  • Perform move-out inspections separate from tenants after an appropriate “vacancy period”.
General Recommendations for Cleaning per the CDC

Household members should educate themselves about COVID-19 symptoms and preventing the spread of COVID-19 in homes. Regular, daily, cleaning and disinfecting of high-touch
surfaces in household common areas – e.g. tables, hard-backed chairs, doorknobs, light switches, remotes, handles, desks, toilets, sinks – is a best, preventative measure to reduce the risk of transmission of the virus. Other methods for preventing contraction include:

  • Washing hands frequently or use a 60% or greater alcohol-based hand sanitizer if unable to wash.
  • Cover coughs with a tissue and throw the tissue away.
  • Avoid touching eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with those who are sick.
  • If you are sick, minimize contact with others.

For more information about the CDC’s cleaning recommendations, please visit this link.

How to Clean and Disinfect Surfaces
  • Wear disposable gloves when cleaning and disinfecting surfaces. Gloves should be
    discarded after each cleaning. If reusable gloves are used, those gloves should be dedicated for cleaning and disinfection of surfaces for COVID-19 and should not be used for other purposes. Consult the manufacturer’s instructions for cleaning and disinfection products used. Clean hands immediately after gloves are removed.
  • If surfaces are dirty, they should be cleaned using a detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.
  • For disinfection, diluted household bleach solutions, alcohol solutions with at least 70% alcohol, and most common EPA-registered household disinfectants should be effective.
    • Diluted household bleach solutions can be used if appropriate for the surface. Follow manufacturer’s instructions for application and proper ventilation. Check to ensure the product is not past its expiration date. Never mix household bleach with ammonia or any other cleanser. Unexpired household bleach will be effective against coronaviruses when properly diluted.
      • Prepare a bleach solution by mixing:
        • 5 tablespoons (1/3rd cup) bleach per gallon of water or
        • 4 teaspoons bleach per quart of water
      • Products with EPA-approved emerging viral pathogens are expected to be effective against COVID-19 based on data for harder to kill viruses. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for all cleaning and disinfection products (e.g., concentration, application method and contact time, etc.).
    • For soft (porous) surfaces such as carpeted floor, rugs, and drapes, remove visible
      contamination if present and clean with appropriate cleaners indicated for use on these surfaces. After cleaning:
      • Launder items as appropriate in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.
        If possible, launder items using the warmest appropriate water setting for the items and dry items completely, or
      • Use products with the EPA-approved emerging viral pathogens claims that are
        suitable for porous surfaces.

If you have additional questions, please direct them to public health authorities in your area to receive the most accurate and complete information about coronavirus:

• Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC)
• Local Health Departments


Free ONDEMAND Webinars

Colleen M. Melody, Civil Rights Division Chief at the Office of the WA State Attorney General will join us to review and discuss the latest COVID-19 orders. RHAWA Board Member and Attorney, Christopher Cutting will moderate the discussion. You can pre-submit a question when you register, or submit questions during the live online session. Watch now >

Join us for this one-hour online Q&A session with John Wilson, King County Tax Assessor, moderated by RHAWA Government Affairs Director, Kyle Woodring. John will present on the economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and answer questions on the future of King County’s recovery. Pre-submit your questions when you register for the event. Watch now >

The COVID-19 pandemic is causing disruptions to the lives of many, and housing providers are no exception. Political ramifications for the rental housing industry are many and continue to evolve at a rapid pace. Join RHAWA Government Affairs Director Kyle Woodring for a breakdown of the Governor’s emergency orders for rental housing to lean what’s happening now, steps to take to comply, and what discussions are occurring at the local and the state levels which inform us as to what the rest of 2020 might look like for housing providers. Watch now >

With the pandemic causing a disruption to the lives of so many, there are bound to be political and policy ramifications that will affect the housing industry. RHAWA Government Affairs Director Kyle Woodring will break down what discussions have been happening at the local and the state level and give a preview of what could be in store in 2021. Watch now >

Learn about how Housing Connector can help independent landlords as well as tenants in this hour long live webinar. Executive Director Shkelqim Kelmendi will explain how the program works, what the expectations are from both sides involved in the agreement, and how the program can guarantee rent for landlords regardless of the moratorium. Watch now >

Attorney and RHAWA Board Member, Christopher Cutting joins Sean Martin, RHAWA Executive Director to review resources and forms developed to assist rental home providers with issues related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Watch now >

Rep. Andrew Barkis joins Kyle Woodring, RHAWA's Government Affairs Director, and Jim Henderson, lobbyist for National Association of Residential Property Managers (NARPM) to discuss operating your rental property and the lawmakers' responses during the COVID pandemic. Watch now >

Candice Chevaillier, Principle of the Lee & Associates Northwest Multifamily Team, Kyle Woodring, RHAWA's Government Affairs Director, and Mary Hull-Drury, Washington Realtors Commercial Government Affairs Director highlight the 2020 legislative session and key initiatives, and dive into what's happening at the State and City level with regard to COVID-19. Watch now >


Financial Resources for Housing Providers

Disaster Assistance | Economic Injury Disaster Loans and Loan Advance

To apply for a COVID-19 Economic Injury Disaster Loan, click here.

In response to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, small business owners in all U.S. states, Washington D.C., and territories are eligible to apply for an Economic Injury Disaster Loan advance of up to $10,000. The SBA’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan program provides small businesses with working capital loans of up to $2 million that can provide vital economic support to small businesses to help overcome the temporary loss of revenue they are experiencing.

The loan advance will provide economic relief to businesses that are currently experiencing a temporary loss of revenue. Funds will be made available within three days of a successful application, and this loan advance will not have to be repaid.

Economic Injury Disaster Loans are also available to residents in declared disaster areas. To view the full list of disaster declarations, click here.

The Paycheck Protection Program

The Paycheck Protection Program prioritizes millions of Americans employed by small businesses by authorizing up to $349 billion toward job retention and certain other expenses.

Small businesses and eligible non-profit organizations, Veterans organizations, and
Tribal businesses described in the Small Business Act, as well as individuals who are self-employed or are independent contractors, are eligible if they also meet program
size standards.

Under this program:

  • Eligible recipients may qualify for a loan up to $10 million determined by 8 weeks of prior average payroll plus an additional 25% of that amount.
  • Loan payments will be deferred for six months.
  • If you maintain your workforce, SBA will forgive the portion of the loan proceeds that are used to cover the first 8 weeks of payroll and certain other expenses following loan origination.

View a summary of CARES Act SBA Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) & Loan Forgiveness Program.

The following information is based upon expert feedback provided to RHAWA by lenders but does not constitute formal or professional advice. RHAWA is not responsible for the accuracy of this information, and members are encouraged to seek out additional information from a trusted financial professional.

While many mortgage lenders do not offer support or leniency for hardship in the case of rental property (non-owner occupied), there are other ways rental owners might free up cash to survive tough times.

  • Bridge Loans (hard money / private money loans): Short-term bridge loans provide a short-term loan using the rental(s) as collateral so that owners can cover costs, lost rents, improvements, etc. Loans are anywhere from 6 months up to a year, but rates are higher than conventional loans since they are short-term. Bridge loans are available for all rental types – single family, multi-family and large/commercial multi-family.
  • Long-term rental programs: Another option would be to refinance the property so that the owner to take cash out to cover expenses. Owners who can’t qualify conventionally or can’t wait the 30-day period may qualify for a cash-out refinance on a rental property. This option is usually only for 1-4 units and not commercial.
  • Retirement plan loans: Some employer-supported 401k plans allow taking out loans, typically at defined interest rates and a defined time for when it is required to be paid back. Unlike an early withdrawal which automatically faces penalties and taxes, you may not be charged any penalties or taxes because it’s a loan and not cashed out plan money. An additional option is those with qualifying retirement plans (Solo 401k) can take a personal loan up to 50% of the total value, or $50K maximum.

RHAWA also recommends that rental owners facing financial hardship contact their
mortgage lender about temporary mortgage relief and federal mortgage assistance to
protect your credit, prevent foreclosure, and ensure your rental property remains available and on the market.

The Washington State Department of Commerce Landlord Fund Programs also provide
access to reimbursements for unpaid rent.

Additional Resources

Financial Resources for Renters

Assistance may not be continuously available during the crisis.

Stimulus check - The IRS and the Treasury Department say Americans will start receiving their economic impact checks in the next three weeks. Here's how to get yours.

State Resources

Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP)
Providing funds from a federal block grant program to help low-income Washington state households maintain affordable, dependable utility services and avoid shutoff during the winter. LIHEAP makes energy assistance available to citizens of Washington through a network of community action agencies and local municipalities. These organizations perform program eligibility determinations and award LIHEAP grants to eligible households. Each agency has their own procedures that will need to be followed in order to receive LIHEAP services.

Washington 211

Washington State Unemployment Insurance
Unemployment is available to employees whose employer has been closed by a public health official, the employer has closed due to a slow down or lack of demand, or the
employer reduces hours of employees due to a lack of demand or because of a slowdown.
It is also available if the employee has contracted a mild case of COVID-19 or if the
employee was potentially exposed and is quarantined.

Washington State Paid Sick Leave
Paid sick leave is available when the employee has become sick from COVID-19, was exposed to COVID-19 and has become quarantined, the employee is caring for a sick family member, schools are closed by a public official and the employee has no childcare. Paid sick leave is also available when the employer is shut down because of quarantine by a public official. Health care workers and first responders in quarantine are also eligible for paid sick leave.

Washington State Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA)
FMLA is available when the employee is severely sick because of the COVID-19 virus and when the employee is caring for a family member experiencing the COVID-19 virus.

Washington Tenancy Preservation Program
Available to landlords in reimbursement after an eviction judgment is entered by a court in an unlawful detainer proceeding, subject to the tenant’s reinstatement of the tenancy.

Rental Assistance Programs

Christ the King Catholic Church  |  (509) 946-1675  |  1111 Stevens Dr, Richland 99354
The center offers assistance programs and limited financial aid. This includes money for utilities, prescription medications, rent/housing, clothing, food/household goods, gasoline, and furniture.

Salvation Army  |  1 (800) SAL-ARMY (509) 547-2138  |  303 W Clark St, Pasco 99352
May help with utility bills.

St Vincent de Paul of Richland Washington  |  (509) 783-7020
731 N Columbia Center Blvd, Ste 114, Kennewick 99336
The center offers assistance programs and limited financial aid. This includes money for utilities, prescription medications, rent/housing, clothing, food/household goods, gasoline, and furniture.

Tri-Cities Food Bank  |  (509) 943-2795  |  321 Wellsian Way, Richland 99352
At each visit to a distribution center, an individual or family is provided with up to a week’s supply of free food and groceries. Individuals and families may receive a variety of free groceries and other aid, including canned goods, meat, eggs, margarine or butter, beans, rice, flour, miscellaneous donated foods and supplies, and pasta products.

United Way (Serves Benton + Franklin counties)  |  bfcac.org  |  unitedway-bfco.com

Energy Assistance Programs

If you’re struggling to pay utility bills, contact your provider immediately. Many providers offer emergency assistance programs.

Christ the King Catholic Church  |  (509) 946-1675  |  1111 Stevens Dr, Richland 99354
The center offers assistance programs and limited financial aid. This includes money for
utilities, prescription medications, rent/housing, clothing, food/household goods, gasoline, and furniture.

Salvation Army  |  1 (800) SAL-ARMY (509) 547-2138  |  303 W Clark St, Pasco 99352
May help with utility bills.

Rental Assistance Programs

Clark County Community Action Program  |  (360) 397-2130
Program provides financial assistance to stop evictions, and prevent homelessness.

Clark County Community Services Department  |  (360) 695-9677
Provides financial resources to prevent evictions, stop foreclosures, keep the power on and address home improvements.

Clark County Veterans Assistance Program  |  (360) 397-8478
Provides assistance to veterans, widowed spouses or dependents of veterans. Programs may be offered for rent assistance; energy bills; free food; transportation; meals; prescription drug expenses; clothing; car repair; dental; medical expenses; and burial costs.

Inter-Faith Treasure House  |  (360) 834-4181
Provides rent assistance, help with paying utility, PUD, heating and water bills. Food boxes. Baby Clothing. All services are dependent on funding availability.

St. Vincent De Paul of Vancouver  |  (360) 694-5388
Provides a host of programs, including direct financial assistance, primarily for food and clothing, including limited rent, housing and utility bill assistance to families with children.

Rental Assistance Programs

Bellevue LifeSpring  |  help@bellevuelifespring.org
Bellevue LifeSpring fosters stability and self-sufficiency for Bellevue’s children and their families through programs that provide food, clothing, education and emergency assistance.

Byrd Barr Place  |  (206) 812-4940  |  722 18th Ave, Seattle
Byrd Barr Place is committed to preventing homelessness in Seattle. They can help avoid eviction with temporary rental assistance or connect you to housing resources.

Catholic Community Services  |  (206) 328-5724
Offers King County residents emergency assistance. At most once per year, the non-profit provides move-in cost assistance, eviction prevention, emergency rent help and limited motel and shelter vouchers.

El Centro De La Raza  |  (206) 329-0786
Provides assistance for various types of housing emergencies.

Home Base
Home Base provides emergency rental assistance so people don’t fall behind and end up with a mountain of debt to repay after the COVID-19 crisis passes.

Housing Connector
The bridge that connects private property owners / managers in King County to those most in need of housing.

Jewish Family Services | (206) 861-8796 | 1601 16th Ave, Seattle
JFS provides services to people of all backgrounds as well as Jewish individuals and families. Financial assistance may be available for emergencies like eviction prevention, move-in costs such as first/last months’ rent and security deposits, medical expenses, past due utility bills, transportation, or school clothes.

Kent Youth and Family Services  |  (253) 859-0300 x302
We provide long-term case management with the goal of helping our clients create long-term stability. Kent Youth and Family Services does not help with rent, but can help financially to prevent imminent homelessness.

Multi-Service Center  |  (253) 893-0024 (1st/3rd Tues of month, 9am- Noon)

Neighborhood House  |  (206) 825-2581  |  homelessnessprevention@nhwa.org
Homelessness Prevention hotline is available to assist residents living within the city limits of Seattle and have a past due notice, bill or ledger for rent. Our hotline is open on Mondays between 8am and 6pm.

Queen Anne Helpline  |  (206) 282-1540
Queen Anne Helpline prevents homelessness and stabilizes the lives of neighbors in need through financial and supportive services.

Solid Ground  |  (206) 694-6767
Free eviction counseling, and basically free advice for those who receive eviction notices. Also get advice and support including information on tenants’ rights and responsibilities. No rental and utilities assistance. Open Monday and Thursday until 1pm.

Saint Vincent de Paul Financial Assistance  |  (206) 767-6449  |  5950 4th Ave S, Seattle
The Society of Saint Vincent de Paul is one of the largest charity organizations in the country. They are committed to providing social services, resources and financial assistance across the United States. The Society of St. Vincent de Paul parish near you is a non-profit that offers a unique style of personal assistance with food, clothing, gasoline, medicine, rent, utilities, and transportation to people facing economic or emotional crises. People of all backgrounds and religion can get assistance.

Salvation Army  |  (206) 447-9944  |  811 Maynard Ave S, Seattle
Resources can help with housing needs, with a focus on preventing homelessness in the King County area. Some of the services can include eviction prevention, move-in and security deposit assistance, limited rent help, and utility bill assistances. Counseling services are provided at the same time. Any type of assistance paid out is by appointment only and may require an interview process.

University Churches Emergency Fund  |  (206) 524-7885  |  4515 16th Ave NE, Seattle
Can offer emergency assistance up to once per year. Income limitations are in place. Call the program to get emergency financial assistance and referrals to non-profits.

Wellspring Family Services Housing Services  |  (206) 902-4271  |  1900 Rainier Ave S, Seattle
Offers programs including eviction prevention and rental assistance. Among other housing programs and services, the agency provides limited financial assistance and cash grants
for low-income (50% or less of HUD income guidelines) and working poor individuals and families. In addition, speak to a counselor about housing stability services, advocacy, and eviction prevention programs.

West Seattle Helpline  |  (206) 932-4357
Provides limited emergency rent assistance to prevent eviction from homes and apartments.

YWCA Assistance Programs  |  (206) 461-4851
Hundreds of non-profit and charities are part of the YWCA or they work closely with the organization. The agency provides several services to women, their children, and families. Every year millions of people turn to the non-profit for help with childcare, economic empowerment, employment, and assistance for domestic violence. The YWCA also supports veterans and their families.

Utilities / Energy Assistance Programs

All Seattle Kids Home  |  (206) 488-2692
Multi-lingual service focuses on families in imminent risk of homelessness. They can provide critical resources to help families remain in safe housing or find new housing.

Byrd Barr Place  |  (206) 812-4940  |  722 18th Ave, Seattle
Byrd Barr Place is committed to preventing homelessness in Seattle. They can help avoid eviction with temporary rental assistance or connect you to housing resources.

Catholic Community Services  |  (206) 328-5724
Offers King County residents emergency assistance. At most once per year, the non-profit provides move-in cost assistance, eviction prevention, emergency rent help and limited motel and shelter vouchers.

El Centro De La Raza  |  (206) 329-0786
Provides assistance for various types of housing emergencies.

Jewish Family Services | (206) 861-8796 | 1601 16th Ave, Seattle
JFS provides services to people of all backgrounds as well as Jewish individuals and families. Financial assistance may be available for emergencies like eviction prevention, move-in costs such as first/last months’ rent and security deposits, medical expenses, past due utility bills, transportation, or school clothes.

Kent Youth and Family Services  |  (253) 859-0300 x302

Multi-Service Center  |  (253) 893-0024 (1st/3rd Tues of month, 9am- Noon)

Neighborhood House  |  (206) 825-2581  |  homelessnessprevention@nhwa.org

Queen Anne Helpline  |  (206) 282-1540
Queen Anne Helpline prevents homelessness and stabilizes the lives of neighbors in need through financial and supportive services.

Solid Ground  |  (206) 694-6767
Some limited one-time rental assistance is offered. However more extensive is free eviction counseling, and basically free advice for those who receive eviction notices. Also get advice and support including information on tenants’ rights and responsibilities.

Saint Vincent de Paul Financial Assistance  |  (206) 767-6449  |  5950 4th Ave S, Seattle
The Society of Saint Vincent de Paul is one of the largest charity organizations in the country. They are committed to providing social services, resources and financial assistance across the United States. The Society of St. Vincent de Paul parish near you is a non-profit that offers a unique style of personal assistance with food, clothing, gasoline, medicine, rent, utilities, and transportation to people facing economic or emotional crises. People of all backgrounds and religion can get assistance.

Salvation Army  |  (206) 447-9944  |  811 Maynard Ave S, Seattle
Resources can help with housing needs, with a focus on preventing homelessness in the King County area. Some of the services can include eviction prevention, move-in and security deposit assistance, limited rent help, and utility bill assistances. Counseling services are provided at the same time. Any type of assistance paid out is by appointment only and may require an interview process.

University Churches Emergency Fund  |  (206) 524-7885  |  4515 16th Ave NE, Seattle
Can offer emergency assistance up to once per year. Income limitations are in place. Call the program to get emergency financial assistance and referrals to non-profits.

Wellspring Family Services Housing Services  |  (206) 902-4271  |  1900 Rainier Ave S, Seattle
Offers programs including eviction prevention and rental assistance. Among other housing programs and services, the agency provides limited financial assistance and cash grants
for low-income (50% or less of HUD income guidelines) and working poor individuals and families. In addition, speak to a counselor about housing stability services, advocacy, and eviction prevention programs.

West Seattle Helpline  |  (206) 932-4357 
Provides limited emergency rent assistance to prevent eviction from homes and apartments.

YWCA Assistance Programs  |  (206) 461-4851
Hundreds of non-profit and charities are part of the YWCA or they work closely with the
organization. The agency provides several services to women, their children, and families. Every year millions of people turn to the non-profit for help with childcare, economic empowerment, employment, and assistance for domestic violence. The YWCA also supports veterans and their families.

Conflict Resolution

Bellevue Conflict Resolution Center  |  (425) 452-4091  |  bcrc@bellevuewa.gov
Provides phone coaching and conciliation, online mediation to help folks find win-win resolutions to issues such as rent payments, hygienic safety for moving in and out, the need to stay home for safety or recovery, and any other issue they may have.

Bremerton Housing Authority  |  COVID-19 Rental Assistance Program  |  (360) 616-7140
svancleve@bremertonhousing.org
Eligible Bremerton residents will have the opportunity to have a portion of their rent paid as a result of their reduced income or job losses due to the COVID-19 outbreak.

Rental Assistance Programs

Catholic Community Services  |  (206) 328-5724
Offers Pierce County residents emergency assistance. At most once per year, the non-profit provides move-in cost assistance, eviction prevention, emergency rent help, and limited motel and shelter vouchers.

Exodus Housing  |  (253) 862-6808
Households receive monthly rental assistance if needed. The Household pays a percentage of their income towards the rent, which is paid directly to the landlord and Exodus Housing subsidizes the rest. The goal is for the client portion to increase and Exodus Housing’s portion to decrease throughout their time in the program. This continues until the household is ready to exit and pay the full rent on their own.

Helping Hands House  |  (253) 848-6096
Helping Hand House provides assistance through multiple housing programs, serving families who need varying degrees of assistance based on their current situation.

Pierce County Rental Assistance Program
Emergency rental assistance program application

Pierce County Veterans Assistance Program
May provide emergency rent, mortgage, utilities, and/or back payments assistance to Veterans.

Share and Care House  |  Puyallup (253) 841-8886  |  Tacoma (253) 564-4194
Share & Care House is currently a provider of Supportive Housing Community Support Services; or ongoing services and supports to help eligible individuals obtain and maintain housing.

St. Vincent de Paul of Tacoma-Pierce County  |  (253) 474-0519
assistance@svdptacoma.org  |  4009 S 56th St, Tacoma, WA 98409

Utilities / Energy Assistance Programs

If you’re struggling to pay utility bills, contact your provider immediately. Many providers offer emergency assistance programs.

Energy Assistance Program (EAP)
The Energy Assistance Program (EAP) pays heating bills directly to utility companies for eligible applicants. Payments are based on eligible household’s fuel usage for the past 12 months and income.

Metropolitan Development Council  |  (253) 383-3921  |  721 Fawcett Ave, Tacoma
The Energy Assistance Program provides a one-time per program-year grant to assist eligible low-income households with heating costs. To apply, you must live within the city of Tacoma and meet the income guidelines. Payment is made directly to the heating vendor and the amount paid will be based on your last 12 months’ heating costs. Call the appointment line at (253) 572-5557 for an appointment Monday throught Friday 9am to 2pm.

Tacoma Public Utilities (TPU)  |  (253) 502-8600
We offer several options for payment assistance and will work with you to develop payment arrangements. We’ve extended our due date from 15 days to 12 weeks and can waive late fees. TPU customers who are having trouble paying their bills should contact Customer Service at (253) 502-8600 or (800) 752-6745 and ask about extended payment plans. The department is open Monday through Friday from 8am to 5:30pm.

Washington State Department of Commerce

Unlimited Network  |  (253) 460-3134  |  2610 Sunset Dr W, University Place
Utility Assistance for anyone who resides in the 98466 & 98467. Services are not based or limited on income.

Food Assistance Programs

Workforce Central

  • Free breakfast and lunch locations for students affected by Tacoma Public Schools
    closures
  • Food and supplies delivery for those who are sick, quarantined, immunocompromised
    or elderly
  • Food pantry locations in Pierce County provided by the Emergency Food Network
Rental Assistance Programs

ARC of Snohomish County  |  (425) 258-2459
2500 Hewitt Ave, Suite 300, Everett 98201
Clients need to have a developmental disability. Children and adults may get emergency rental assistance.

Domestic Violence Services of Snohomish County  |  (425) 252-2873
Offers a wide range of programs and services, all of which are free of charge. For information or help on housing programs or any of our programs and services, please contact our 24-hour support hotline at (425) 252-2873 (425) 25-ABUSE. DVS programs and services are available to men, women and children. There are a number of different housing programs available, but you must first call the 24-hour support hotline to see if you qualify.

DSHS Rental Assistance and the HEN program  |  Dial 211
This service can provide help for rent as well as utilities and address affordable housing issues in Snohomish County.

  • DSHS Everett Community Service Office  |  (425) 259-3191
    840 N Broadway, Ste 200, Everett 98201
    Offers financial assistance, including rent and housing support. Includes TANF/WorkFirst, Diversion Cash Assistance and other low-income housing aid.

Everett Housing Authority  |  (425) 258-9222  |  3107 Colby Ave in Everett 98206
Offers rental subsidies for hundreds of families and manages housing for the low income and working poor. Section 8 is available when the waiting list is not in place.

Family Center of South Snohomish County  |  (425) 670-8984
They will only provide help as part of the Kinship Program. So, if a relative is raising another family member, then financial aid or no interest loans may be offered for rent, energy bills,
or housing costs.

Holy Cross Catholic Church  |  (360) 691-2273 | 6915 SR 92, Granite Falls 98252
A very limited amount of financial support can be provided to Granite Falls and Lake Stevens Washington residents for expenses such as rent. It is an Emergency Needs Program.

Housing Authority of Snohomish County  |  (425) 290-8499
12625 4th Ave W, #200, Everett 98204
Provides permanent supportive housing as part of Shelter Plus Care Program (for the disabled). They also have information on shelters and subsidized rent assistance programs in Everett and the county.

Pathways for Women - YWCA  |  (425) 774-9843  |  6027 208th St SW, Lynnwood 98036
From time to time may have limited funds to offer rental assistance when funding is available to prevent families from becoming homeless.

Saint Vincent De Paul - Snohomish Co. Council  |  (425) 355-3505
6424 Broadway Ave, Everett 98213
Can help meet critical needs. Offers furniture (including delivery), assistance for paying rent or utilities, or even medications. In some cases, this charity will issue a loan as a form of
rental help. Or find more details on Snohomish County St. Vincent rent programs.

Salvation Army Everett Corps  |  (425) 259-8129  |  2525 Rucker, Everett 98201

Snohomish County HUD
Grants for homeless prevention are distributed to local non-profits. The money is provided for rent, utilities, and security deposits. HPRP also provide emergency money for rehousing into low income apartments, and there may be rental deposits or free motel vouchers provided. More on Snohomish County eviction and rehousing help.

Snohomish County Rent Assistance  |  General intake (425) 388-7200
If you have a 3 day pay notice to be evicted, then emergency rental assistance may be offered. The program may run out of funds on occasion. They also have information on shelters and transitional housing units

Sound Families
Runs a rental and voucher program. Working with YWCA of Snohomish County, Catholic Community Services (888) 240-8572), Housing Hope (425) 347-6556), and Volunteers of America. Programs for security deposits, self-sufficiency, and guidance.

Stanwood Camano Community Resource Center  |  (360) 629-5257
9620 271st St NW, Stanwood 98292
Runs a service known as Basic Subsistence - Emergency Financial Aid. The agency can offer limited financial assistance for essential services or basic needs, such as rent and housing, for persons residing within the boundaries of the Stanwood-Camano School District.

Take the Next Step  |  For info. on rent & housing (360) 794-1022  |  202 S Sams St, Monroe 98272
They only provide information and referrals. Receive details on local rental assistance programs, low income housing, grants, addiction services, and more. All callers need to live in Monroe, or the Sky Valley area. Programs are suspended at this time.

Utilities / Energy Assistance Programs

If you’re struggling to pay utility bills, contact your provider immediately. Many providers offer emergency assistance programs.

Domestic Violence Services of Snohomish County  |  (425) 259-2827
The agency helps mostly women, refugees and children fleeing, or that are surviving, violence. They offer free transportation to transitional housing or shelters as well as rent or mortgage help. Funds may help pay security or utility deposits as well on a safe home.

DSHS Rental Assistance and the HEN program  |  Dial 211
This service can provide help for rent as well as utilities and address affordable housing issues in Snohomish County.

Saint Vincent De Paul - Snohomish Co. Council  |  (425) 355-3505
6424 Broadway Ave, Everett 98213
Can help meet critical needs. Offers furniture (including delivery), assistance for paying rent or utilities, or even medications. In some cases, this charity will issue a loan as a form of rental help. Or find more details on Snohomish County St. Vincent rent programs.

Snohomish County HUD
Grants for homeless prevention are distributed to local non-profits. The money is provided for rent, utilities, and security deposits. HPRP also provide emergency money for rehousing into low income apartments, and there may be rental deposits or free motel vouchers provided. More on Snohomish County eviction and rehousing help.

Snohomish County Public Utilities District (PUD)  |  (425) 783-1000
The PUD wants to help each customer with his/her individual needs. Any customer in need can call PUD Customer Service at (425) 783-1000 and representatives can help make payment arrangements. The PUD will not disconnect customers for late payment at this time but advises customers to continue regular payments to avoid falling behind. The PUD offers discount programs for income-qualified customers. These programs include provisions to help in situations of sudden job loss.

Washington State Department of Commerce

Rental Assistance Programs

Bellingham and Whatcom County Love  |  (360) 671-6201  |  1998 Midway Ln, Bellingham, WA 98226
Limited financial resources include prescription co-pays, back to work needs (such as work boots) and transportation funding for those who are homeless and moving into housing.

Opportunity Council  |  (360) 734-5121
Provides programs and offer services that are key to increased self-sufficiency and creating positive change for the unemployed, low and fixed income people. Services offered by the agency include housing, rent assistance, food, shelter, prescriptions, childcare, head start, information and referral to other federal government and Washington programs. Resources are limited.

Sacred Heart Church  |  (360) 734-2850  |  1110 14th St, Bellingham 98225
can provide emergency food or one time financial aid for security deposits, rent, or energy bills. There may also be clothing or gas vouchers for work reasons.

St Paul’s Episcopal Church Alms Ministry  I  (360) 733-2890  |  2117 Walnut St, Bellingham 98225
Hours: Tuesday 9-10am, room #113. Emergency financial assistance for transportation, food, utilities, and other emergency needs. No motel or rental assistance.

Whatcom Salvation Army  |  (360) 733-1410
Provides assistance to individuals facing a one-time crisis but have historically been stable. Examples of who the Salvation Army tends to help will be residents faced with a serious
illness, accident, short term reduction in hours, medical condition at work, or violence.
In general, any help for expenses such as rent or energy bills is for individuals that were
self-sufficient before the crisis.


Legal Disclaimer: The Rental Housing Association of Washington (RHAWA) has made every attempt to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information provided on this webpage. However, the information is provided “as is” without warranty of any kind and is subject to change as new information becomes available. RHAWA does not accept any responsibility or liability for the accuracy, content, completeness, legality, or reliability of the information contained in this publication.

No warranties, promises and / or representations of any kind, expressed or implied, are given as to the nature, standard, accuracy or otherwise of the information provided in this publication, nor to the suitability or otherwise of the information to your particular circumstances. Your specific circumstances may present additional information not considered when this webpage was created and personal consultation with an attorney is advised.


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